A Saunter through Silverton

In outback Silverton a donkey by the name of Pancakes (AKA Dollar) roams the village. No-one’s quite sure how old he is but he’s been there for years, the last of his lineage apparently.  I introduced him in Opposites in Nature and a few people including Nikki and Steve were quite smitten by him, so I thought I’d do a follow up on him and his hometown.

Pancakes 1 (800x600)

Silverton was used as a movie set for Mad Max, Mission Impossible II and A Town Like Alice but, unless a film crew comes to town, this is a quiet place.

Pre Mad Max, way back in 1885, it had 10 pubs, three breweries and 3000 people.  Today there’s less than 40 people that live here but the town’s far from dead.  Just ask this guy.

Pancakes 4 (800x600)

He has a routine: 9.30am breakfast on the Horizon veranda, then off to the school museum and from there he makes his way to the gaol and back around to the pub.

Where ever he goes he gets pats, sometimes sandwiches and bowls of water.  He’s loved by the locals and he greets visitors to the town.  When we drove through for the first time he came up to our car and practically stuck his head in the window in greeting.

He might not say much but he makes himself known.

Pancakes in the shade (800x600)

I rang the Silverton Information Centre today to check he was still alive and sure enough he is. I suspect he may live for decades yet. Still playing the starring role.

But there’s more to Silverton than just a resident donkey.

There’s history, including the old school and museum, the church used now by artists, a gaol with plenty of stories, a genuine outback pub and the fascinating Day Dream mine.

And there’s plenty of nostalgic fun for Mad Max fans inside the Mad Max Museum.

Car Justin Cowley gallery (800x600)

Then there’s the art. This backdrop is an artist’s paradise and the galleries are full of the colors and tones of Australia.  And quirky bits and pieces.

Outback gallery (800x600)

I fell in love with the drawings inside this gallery by artist Justin Cowley. His art is quirky and fun and I couldn’t resist buying six postcards, which are stuck to my fridge at home.

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Here they are, vibrant and colorful – like Silverton itself.

P1140384 (800x600)

Wild horses roam around the outskirts of town.

Grazing peacefully. Minding their own business.

Framed in ruins (800x600)

Old crumbling buildings depict how the place once was.  Here I am framed in ruin.

Main Street in Silverton

It takes about two hours walking to see all of Silverton’s sights and buildings, depending on how long you linger in the studios!

Driving through Silverton

Just out of town, the Mundi Mundi Plains is breathtaking.

The view of the barren desert wasteland in the wide, flat heart of the Australian outback goes on forever and it’s spectacular, especially at sunset.

Sunset and Mundi Mundi (800x600)

On a clear day the curvature of the earth can be seen. Or so they say.

Sunset gazing (800x600)

Silverton is a special place, one that evokes all the senses and it got under my skin and into my soul.  It’s a place to experience a true Australian outback experience amid a canvas of red earth and brilliant blue skies.

I fell in love with it, with the dusty wide streets and the red earth, the colors, the bold art and the peace and quiet… and the docile village donkey that stole my heart.

Wishing you all light, love and color in your day.  Where ever you are, I hope that the magic of life touches you.

Keep enjoying the journey.

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57 thoughts on “A Saunter through Silverton

  1. I really admire how the Donkey is being treated on some of the pictures as well as the appearance.
    It really showcase the beauty of humanity within us being alive.

    Ill tell you about other places i have seen, Donkeys are nothing but a means to carry goods mostly.

    To treat every animal as a friend is a dear tale and feature i am learning through out an’ about. Means so much thank you for this

    Thats another fascinating detour, i like places with so many stories to tell about it. Lovely read as always Miriam. I hope your doing good my dear! – Cezane

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks so much Cezane. I don’t know if this donkey has ever been used as a pack animal but if he has he’s now living a good life in retirement! 🙂
      Thanks for your lovely comment, as you’ve obviously gathered by now, I do have a soft spot for animals, big and small! Take care and enjoy the rest of your week. xo

      Liked by 3 people

  2. This was a really lovely story; heartwarming to think Pancakes lives amongst people so easily, and that everyone is kind towards him. It’s such a nice contrast to these stories filling the internet about hunting and disregard for animals. Think this is my favourite story I’ve read all day!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ha, that’s funny. Must admit I love mine tours but I’m getting a bit claustrophobic in my old age. And yeah, that whole outback area is fantastic, we loved Menindi too. It was an oasis after Silverton.

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  3. Silverton looks like a very interesting town to visit. But I especially loved Pancakes! What a nice life he has as the town’s mascot. I have no idea what the average life span is for a donkey, but I hope he is there for many more years to come.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Those are some big films for such a small town. It looks like a great place to film one of those Hollywood westerns. Pancakes looks like he still has plenty of life. Thanks for sharing this. Have a great weekend.

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  5. Thanks for sharing these photos, and writing this blog. What an awesome town. I’m adding to my bucket list: Feed Pancakes a sandwich and the Mad Max museum. Great sunset picture.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. He is just too cute for words!!

    That is one interesting town. Betting that Mad Max museum is pretty wild and the gallery too. The postcards are super cute. I like the last one best, but they make a nice set! 🙂
    Thanks for indulging those of us smitten with Pancakes…this was so much fun to read. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

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